Float #140: Eleven Point River

24 Feb

Greer to Riverton

F90_ElevenPoint

Eleven Point River
Oregon County, Missouri
Saturday, February 11 – Sunday, February 12, 2017
19 Miles
Temperature: 79˚/50˚, 62˚/36˚
Wind: S at 8mph, N at 10mph
Water Level: 2.8ft. at Bardley gage

The past couple years of blogging I have only been writing trip reports for sections of river I had not previously paddled. However, last year those new trips were pretty infrequent. So for this year I decided to write a trip report for every trip, even if it’s a stretch I’ve done a thousand times. Even though this trip report will not be as extensive as the original report, there is always something different to see. Documenting the weather and water level also gives a good idea of what the river is like at that time of year. So here goes our first repeat trip report!

If you live in the Missouri Ozarks area, you know this February has been unseasonably warm. So warm in fact that DW and I decided to do an overnight float on the Eleven Point, a river we usually reserve for the dog days of summer. We both needed a getaway, but not having time or money for a vacation meant a trip to our favorite Missouri river would have to satisfy our yearning for adventure. Plus, we have never been to the Eleven Point in the winter and we were eager to see how the river would be different without leafy vegetation and hot temperatures. We drove down after work on Friday night and rented a lovely little cabin at Hufstedler’s Canoe Rental. Saturday morning, Mike (owner of Hufstedler’s) shuttled us up to Greer Access. We always enjoy talking with Mike. He is a good person, always fair and friendly, and has extensive knowledge of the Eleven Point river and surrounding area. We were not the only people putting on the river, though we may have been the only ones staying out overnight. Most people appeared to be spending the day fishing.

Eleven Point River

Eleven Point River

A Bald Eagle takes fight

Eleven Point River

A small spring we’ve never noticed before

Eleven Point River

Old chimney at Turner Mill

Eleven Point River

The mill wheel in winter

Eleven Point River

Turner Mill spring

We pushed off from Greer around 9:30am. The water of the Eleven Point is mostly spring fed. The water level was pretty near the levels I’m used to in the summer and the clarity was about the same as well. Being spring fed, the water is a consistent temperature year-round. It actually felt a little warmer since it was closer to the air temperature. The best part of this trip was all the things we noticed along the river that we’ve never seen before, due to being covered by leafy foliage in the summer months. We noticed a small spring along a bluff, lots of old foundations and a chimney at Turner Mill, and many other foundations, old roads, and old rock retaining walls along the banks.

It is tradition for DW and I to take a dip in the spring water at Turner Mill and Boze Mill, regardless of the weather. We did it this time too. It was no more shockingly cold than usual, just took more time to warm back up. It may have been the earliest I’ve ever going swimming in the year! There were a lot of Bald Eagles on the river. We saw a couple of adult birds and 3 or 4 juveniles.

Eleven Point River

Ocoee – portrait of a happy canoe dog

Eleven Point River

Our lunch spot

Eleven Point River

Sitting in the canoe is so exhausting

Eleven Point River

Our campsite

Eleven Point River

Evening at camp

We stopped for lunch at a popular camp spot that is always occupied in the summer. We spent a while laying in the sun and enjoying the nice weather. As we paddled onward, we noticed several gravel bar campsites had a stack of nice, split firewood waiting for someone to use. We stopped at one such campsite for the night. Whoever that good samaritan was, thank you! It made setting up camp so much easier! We gathered a bit of deadwood too and left plenty of split firewood for the next campers. Our campsite was on an elevated gravel bar just past Whitten. It is a popular spot with plenty of flat space for a tent. Someone had fashioned steps into the slope of the gravel bar with logs and pegs, making the gear haul from shore to camp much easier. It was a pretty fancy spot! The moon was full that night and so bright we didn’t need any flashlights to see by. The next morning we slept in a bit, warmed our breakfast burritos over the fire, packed up and put on the river around 10:30am.

Eleven Point River

DW in Boze Mill spring

Eleven Point River

Me in Boze Mill spring

Eleven Point River

Turtle pile

Eleven Point River

Riding the rapid at Halls Bay

Sunday was about 15 degrees cooler than Saturday. We donned our wetsuits to keep warm. Especially for our dip in Boze Mill spring. That spring is always very cold and the wetsuit helped minimize the initial shock. It was still damn cold though. Halls Bay rapid was just about perfect. The wave was at a good, fully soaking height. Ocoee got completely swamped in the front of the canoe and DW took on a few inches of water. Always a fun spot on the Eleven Point. We reached Riverton Access around 1:30pm. On the last bend of the river I was picking up trash and came upon a small bottle of Jack Daniels. It was nearly full to the brim of with a dark yellow liquid. I held it up and asked DW, “Wadda’ ya think, whiskey or pee?” The only way to know is to open it up, lol! It was whiskey, thankfully. Then at the access I found a bottle half full of Mountain Dew. I tried to convince DW to try my signature cocktail of river trash whiskey and Mountain Dew, but he declined. And he calls himself adventurous!

Critter Count: 5 Bald Eagles, Osprey, Hawks, Kingfishers, Herons, Turtles

Bonus Prize: Bottle of Jack Daniels

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One Response to “Float #140: Eleven Point River”

  1. ranschwords February 24, 2017 at 6:06 PM #

    Delightful following you as always!

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