Float #123: Missouri River

22 May

Big Muddy Wildlife Area to Cooper’s Landing

F123_Missouri

Missouri River
Boone County, Missouri
Saturday, April 25
15 Miles

I have not been able to paddle the past month, due to a shoulder injury sustained at the MWA Whitewater Clininc earlier in April. DW has done a couple of short floats since then and has blogged them for you all! I hope to be back in action in June.

Lee and I met our friend Richard at Cooper’s Landing to drop off a vehicle for our shuttle. Given I’d spent one of my few hour-plus breaks on the Missouri River 340 race here enjoying beer and Thai food, we didn’t pause to scout the take out. We then journeyed west about 30 minutes to the Big Muddy river access. Upon arriving at the access it was quite apparent how it got its name. The road was covered in several inches of slick river mud. Having an all-wheel-drive vehicle was necessary, as the two wheel drive truck we left at the access likely would not have made it close to the river.

There is supposed to be another road in Big Muddy that takes you to Taylor access, but this road was blocked off. So we continued to a parking lot with an overflow ‘pond’ that is an access for fisherman in small boats. The only direct access to the river was down the blocked off road and that looked like quite the muddy portage for our preferences. We unloaded at the parking lot and Lee, being on the ‘injured reserve list’ due to an April white water injury, headed off for a hike and to eventually pick me up at Cooper’s Landing.

Richard and I threw the boats in the pond and paddled across it in a few short minutes and then begin our first and only portage of the trip. We paddled to where Interstate 70 crosses the pond and I guessed this may be the least rough route to travel. I followed some very small critter trail the best I could, clearing somewhat of a path for Richard. By the time the trail made it to a view of the river I was thinking I was following a pack rat path. We eventually made it after 10 minutes of bushwhacking through last season’s dead, dry weeds.

Putting in at Big Muddy

Putting in at Big Muddy

Missouri RiverMissouri RiverMissouri RiverThis was Richard’s first trip on the mighty Missouri River and my first trip in Lee’s 17′ boat. It didn’t take long to remind me I’ve not been in a narrower long boat since the MR340, so I spent a lot of time learning its lines and trying to not fall in. We paddled down past some pretty bluffs on river left and enjoyed them for the better part of an hour. Once those were out of sight we ventured on to Katfish Katie’s, also on river left. With the size of the Missouri River it’s easy to do a 12 – 17 mile trip and see only three bends and sets of views before you are done.

Missouri RiverMissouri RiverMissouri RiverMissouri RiverMissouri River

There was a really nice, long sand bar just down and across the river from Katfish Katy’s campground. We continued down the river and around the bend. On river left was the second and last sand bar of the trip. After chatting with Richard we determined it was best to continue downstream. The reason we didn’t stop at either beautiful sand bar we passed was simply due to the ominous clouds all around us. Though we got lucky and missed getting any significant rain event, it seemed to happen all around us and most of the time we were away from our camp they were getting rained on. We ventured on a couple miles or so to Cooper’s Landing without any weather issues and enjoyed some cold beer and good Thai food!

Float #122: Mulberry River

24 Apr

Turner Bend to Spirit Creek

F122_Mulberry

Mulberry River
Newton County, Arkansas
Saturday, April 4
14 Miles

Saturday morning we awoke to beautiful, sunny weather for another day on the Mulberry. For our second day of floating I paddled Jake’s touring kayak, DW took my whitewater boat and Jake took DW’s whitewater boat. Since my boat had worn me out so much the first day I decided to take the easier boat for the morning. We headed down to Turner Bend to put in where we had taken out the day before. I hung out with the gear while Jake and DW ran shuttle down to Spirit Creek access. Spirit Creek is a 4WD access with space for about two cars to park by the river. Turns out you really do need 4WD and some ground clearance to make it all the way to the river. Jake’s van didn’t make it all the way down, but he was able to turn around and wait for DW to drop our Subaru at the access. There is a much better access at Campbell Cemetery, which is four miles above Spirit Creek. However, if you take out at Campbell you will miss Hell Roaring Falls, which is a nice little drop that can produce a big wave if the water is up.

The bridge at Turner Bend

The bridge at Turner Bend

Mulberry River

DW paddles through some

DW paddles through some gnar

Mulberry RiverBelow Turner Bend the river has more long pools interspersed with big drops. We didn’t see too many other people on this stretch because most people who rent do the upper section of the Mulberry. We did come across some locals who were doing their annual spring float. They talked to us for a while and gave us the scoop on all the rapids ahead of us. We also talked about the best season for floating the Mulberry, which of course is spring. They said the water is usually plentiful from October to May, so winter floats are also an option.

Stopping for lunch on a rock

Stopping for lunch on a rock

Mulberry RiverMulberry RiverMulberry RiverWe stopped for a quick lunch on a large, flat rock just below a good rapid. We finally saw a bit of wildlife on the river now that the sun was out. There were several turtles sunning themselves, and the usual assortment of birds. Shortly after lunch we pulled over and switched boats. I tried out DW’s boat while Jake took his touring kayak again. The Dagger whitewater boat is a little easier to paddle in a straight line, but I didn’t think it was quite as comfortable to sit in. It is a sort of retro design, with no bells or whistles on the seating and the thigh braces are very tight. However, I went through several rapids in it and didn’t flip over, so that’s something. Jake took my camera and got some nice shots of us paddling through. It’s nice to be in front of the camera sometimes instead of always behind it!

It's ME!

It’s ME!

DW shreds it

DW shreds it

Me, DW and Jake at camp

Me, DW and Jake at camp

After passing the Campbell Cemetery access we kept our eyes peeled for Hell Roaring Falls. It is a rock shelf across the river with about a 3 ft. drop. It looks like it could really rock if the water is up a little! We made it over without incident, but got fairly well splashed in the process. Eventually we came to our take-out around 4pm. We spent a little while relaxing and having a beer by the river. Paddling in rapids is hard work! After loading up our boats we made the trek back up the 4WD access road, over rocks and through one pretty big mud puddle. Back at camp we settled in to burn all the firewood we had left and eat a satisfying meal of spaghetti. It was a great weekend and we had a good time on the river. We will definitely be going back to Arkansas next spring!

Critter Count: Turtles, Hawks, Kingfishers

Float #121: Mulberry River

23 Apr

Wolf Pen to Turner Bend

F121_Mulberry

Mulberry River
Newton County, Arkansas
Friday, April 3
16 Miles

Our Easter float trip this year took us back to Arkansas, this time on the Mulberry River. The Mulberry is about an hour south of the Buffalo River and well worth a visit. It doesn’t have the high bluffs that the Buffalo is famous for, but it has the same beautiful turquoise blue water, Ozark Mountain scenery, and many more rapids. The Mulberry is rain dependent, so the best time to float it is in the spring. It is smaller than the Buffalo, but can rise and fall rapidly depending on the precipitation amount. This is a good river if you like a little excitement and is suitable for an intermediate paddler. If you are a beginner you probably want to hone your skills some before tackling the rocky rapids of the Mulberry. You can float it in a whitewater boat or in a small touring kayak. The upper section has more rapids with few slow pools between them, and the lower section has larger drops between longer pools. None of the rapids on the Mulberry are larger than Class II during normal flow.

DW and I took our whitewater kayaks on this trip. Our friend Jake made the 7-hour trek from Nashville to join us and he brought his 13′ touring kayak. We camped at Byrd’s Adventure Center, where we had a nice camp spot with a pavilion right on the river. There are a couple other commercial campgrounds and a few national forest campgrounds along the river as well.

We were supposed to get a thunderstorm Thursday night, but that never happened. We awoke to cloudy skies on Friday morning, loaded all our gear, donned our wetsuits (cause this water is cold!), dropped a vehicle down at Turner Bend, and headed then up to Wolf Pen access.

Putting in at Wolf Pen

Putting in at Wolf Pen

Mulberry RiverMulberry River

This was my first time ever in a whitewater kayak, so I paddled around a bit in the slow pool at the put-in. Hoo-boy is a whitewater kayak different than a touring boat! Every little move you make causes the boat to react. A touring boat is designed to go forward in a straight line with little effort. A whitewater kayak is designed to spin around in a circle with little effort. I found myself fighting with the boat to try and hit the correct line in the swift water. Obviously I have a lot of learning to do before I feel like I’m competent in a whitewater kayak! DW’s whitewater kayak is a different design and much longer and narrower, so it goes straight a little bit easier than mine.

Mulberry RiverMulberry RiverOf course, I don’t have any photos of the rapids because I was too busy trying to get through them to take a picture. We all made it through most of the rapids without incident until we came upon one called Jump Off Rapid. Jump Off Rapid starts off with a boulder garden that then careens straight into a rock wall. That rock wall is where I bit it. While trying to avoid crashing into the wall I flipped over and was underwater for about 4 seconds. 4 seconds is a long time when you are submerged. Whitewater kayaks are very tight and you don’t fall out of the boat right away like you do in a touring kayak. This was my first time upside down, under water. I remember several thoughts going through my head. The first being, “Well, I’m underwater. Hopefully I don’t drown.” Then I wondered why DW hadn’t flipped me back over yet. Then my brain finally wised up and I pulled my kayak skirt off the cockpit and kicked my legs out of the boat. So I experienced what is known as the “wet-exit” which is a good thing to know when you’re in a whitewater boat!

After my little mishap I was pretty tired. It turns out my whitewater kayak might be too heavy for me and it wears me out fairly quickly. Luckily our campground was exactly half way into our trip. We stopped there for lunch and I decided I was too tired to continue the rest of the trip safely. I let Jake take my whitewater boat so he could experience the wet-exit. And he did, twice.

Jake's first flip

Jake’s first flip

Rescue trainees flip a raft

Rescue trainees flip a raft

Mulberry River

Fixer Upper Cabin

Fixer Upper Cabin

DW takes over narration of the second half of this trip, as I was recovering in camp.

After completing a pit stop at camp for food and adult beverages, we left to complete the second half of our trip down the Mulberry. Jake took Lee’s whitewater kayak and promptly took a swim on an eddy line just after a rapid. This left him a bit rattled given he was on a gravel bar just a few hundred yards from camp. He got the water drained from the boat and regained his nerve thus deciding to complete the trip down the river. It had several rapids that were fun to play in and even more shoals as we worked our way down stream to the low water bridge. We opted for going to river right approaching the bridge. Shortly thereafter there was an old house that is on the river and has just been disintegrating for many years.

Mulberry River

Jake's second flip

Jake’s second flip

Mulberry RiverMulberry River

Almost to the end of our trip, we approached Scroiliac Rapid and both made it through, then out of nowhere Jake is swimming again. The easy maneuverability and large rocker of Lee’s boat caught him off guard on another eddy line allowing for another nice April swim! From here we continued on 1.5 miles to Turner’s Bend to complete our day of adventure on the beautiful Mulberry River. We loaded up our gear and headed back to camp where Lee had a nice fire going. We hit the hay pretty early so we could get enough rest to get up and do it again the next day!

Float #120: Buffalo River

26 Mar

Boxley to Kyle’s Landing

F120_Buffalo

Buffalo River
Newton County, Arkansas
Saturday, March 14
16 Miles

After hanging in camp during the all day rain on Friday, we awoke Saturday determined to paddle. The rain had slowed to an occasional sprinkle. The river was now a muddy brown and had risen to just below the banks. We left camp shortly after breakfast to scout Boxley access, get our car shuttle set up, and purchase some dry firewood. Everything looked good, the water was rocking, but didn’t look too dangerous and we talked to a couple other paddlers getting ready to put in at Boxley. We purchased a car shuttle from Buffalo Outdoor Center in Ponca and headed back to camp to gear up.

We donned our wetsuits (our best purchase this year) and the rest of our water resistant gear, packed a couple beers and headed back to Boxley. There were plenty of rolling waves on the first 6-mile section between Boxley and Ponca and the water was moving quickly. Within the first mile or so we came upon the people we had seen putting in while we were scouting. One of them had lost their boat and was stranded on a small island in the middle of the river. Their paddling companion was just downstream with the runaway boat, so DW towed her down to them. We figured they must have been waiting for someone to come by for a while!

High water at Boxley bridge

High water at Boxley bridge

Buffalo RiverBuffalo River

Waterfall

Waterfalls

The water was a  bit technical and reminded me a lot of the Nantahala in Tennessee. Of course, there is no time to snap photos while paddling the waves, so I was only able to get shots of the calm waters between rapids. Some of the waves were pretty big and one of them went over my head and soaked me completely. Thank goodness I had that wetsuit! My touring paddle was nearly useless for water this fast. It felt like I was just sticking a toothpick in the waves and couldn’t steer as well as I needed to. DW had brought his whitewater paddle and let me use it. What a difference that made! I’m going to make sure I bring my whitewater paddle along for any spring floats from now on.

Ponca bridge

Ponca bridge

Buffalo RiverBuffalo RiverWe soon arrived at Ponca bridge, which we had to portage as the water was not over the bridge, but it was pretty close. There were a lot of people there checking out the river and a few paddlers thinking about putting on. After Ponca bridge the river was much calmer and the few waves we paddled through were not too big. Two miles down from Ponca is Steel Creek campground, so we stopped at our camp to have lunch and warm up a bit. I debated staying at camp because I was a little chilly and tired from the rough water, but the sun poked out of the sky just enough to convince me to continue the rest of the trip. As we put back on the water we encountered some locals who were enjoying the whitewater. They shared some whiskey with us and some good conversation.

Every bluff we passed had numerous waterfalls that were very pretty, but the river was moving so quickly I didn’t have much time to photograph. We soon came to a few more rapids and one nice little drop, where I took on a little bit of water and pulled over to bail. While bailing, another couple paddled up in a tandem kayak with no skirts. They had a look of inexperience about them, so DW talked with them a bit. They asked us where the “hard part” of this section was. As we’ve never paddled this section in high water we didn’t know what they were referring to, but we would soon find out.

There were a few miles between Steel Creek and Kyle’s Landing where around every bend there was a solid line of whitecapped waves. It wasn’t as hard as the Boxley section because the river is wider and there is more room to maneuver and take a different line out of the big waves if needed. I think the waves were just as big though. DW had lots of fun riding the rollers and I did too, though I didn’t hit them quite as hard as he did.

Buffalo RiverBuffalo River

Kyle's Landing

Kyle’s Landing

There were several bluffs along the way that we recognized as we flew past, but everything looked so much different with high water! We soon reached our take out at Kyle’s and pulled off the river with that tired, satisfied feeling you get after a challenging paddle. We had paddled the 8 miles between Steel Creek and Kyle’s in 1 hour and 40 minutes. There was an outfitter waiting to pick up a couple rafts at the access, and he said we were 10 minutes slower than the fastest time he had heard of that day. If I hadn’t stopped to bail my boat we probably would’ve beat that time!

We loaded our gear and changed out of our wet clothes and headed back to camp to a well deserved fire and a hot meal. If we had known it was going to rain that much we would’ve brought our whitewater boats and left the dog at home, but it was pretty entertaining as is. We learned that wetsuits are your best friend and always pack your whitewater paddle in the spring! This was a fun Buffalo trip, despite the rain and I look forward to coming back next spring to do it again.

Float #119: Buffalo River

25 Mar

Kyle’s Landing to Pruitt

F119_Buffalo

Buffalo River
Newton County, Arkansas
Thursday, March 12
13 Miles

DW and I have been wanting to do a spring trip on the Buffalo for a while, so we took a few days off work and headed down there for a little “spring break” paddling. When we left on Wednesday morning the weather was forecast to be warm, with rain on Thursday night and maybe Friday morning. Instead it started raining Thursday afternoon and didn’t stop until Saturday. So, we got some unexpected whitewater in this trip too (which is covered in the next post). We arrived at Steel Creek campground late Wednesday afternoon and set up camp. There were only a few spots taken, which is a nice change from the usual crowded campgrounds of late spring and early summer. The next day we drove down to Kyle’s Landing and purchased a car shuttle from Buffalo Canoe to drop our car at Pruitt. As we put on the river the sky was partly cloudy, but that didn’t last more than a couple hours before the clouds dominated the sky.

Kyle's Landing

DW and Ocoee ready the boats at Kyle’s Landing

Buffalo RiverBuffalo River

Look at that beautiful water!

Look at that beautiful water!

This is the first time we’ve floated the Buffalo with a decent water level. Usually we are scraping and cursing our way down the river. The water was also that unique milky turquoise color that can only be found in the Ozarks. It was by far the prettiest water I’ve seen in a while. All the sections that we usually scrape over were transformed into fast ripples and waves. Ocoee (our dog) rode the back of my kayak and fell off on the first fast section, but he soon gained his footing and was a champ through the rest of the trip.

Buffalo RiverBuffalo River

Elk on the river bank

Elk on the river bank

The trip went by pretty quickly, as the river was flowing at a good pace, about 3 miles per hour. We paddled past numerous towering bluffs, some with small waterfalls trickling over the edge. There were a few hints of green in the forest with some small plants popping up. Spring is almost ready to bloom! We saw the usual birds and turtles along the way and we also got to see an elk. There are a lot of elk living in the Buffalo river basin, but we don’t often see them as we paddle by, so that was pretty cool.

Buffalo RiverBuffalo RiverA mile or two above our takeout at Pruitt it started to sprinkle on us and that was the beginning of 48 hours of non-stop rain. We took out at Pruitt around 4:30pm, loaded our gear into our car and began the drive back to Steel Creek. We only made it a couple miles before we came to a traffic jam. A tractor-trailer had somehow driven the cab off the shoulder of the road and was blocking traffic both ways. We sat there for about 20 minutes as two tow trucks righted the tractor trailer and cleared the scene. No one was hurt and the truck drove away, slightly bruised. It was a good reminder to take it slow on those super curvy mountain roads! On Friday it rained all day long. We were going to paddle if the rain let up for a bit, but every time it slowed down it would ramp up again a few minutes later. Plus it was kinda chilly and there is nothing I hate more than being wet AND cold. We just milled around camp all day, playing cards, reading and being generally bored. We did paddle on Saturday as the weather was warmer and the river was up quite a bit.

Critter Count: Hawks, Kingfishers, Turtles, 1 Elk

Float #118: Osage Fork

25 Mar

Rader Conservation Access to County Rd. J-687

F118_Osage

Osage Fork River
Webster & Laclede Counties, Missouri
Saturday, March 7
4 Miles

I did not go on this trip, so this post was written and photographed by DW.

We started our day out by evaluating an old dump site on the Osage Fork of the Gasconade for cleanup prior to the upcoming NSS Caving Convention. Once our morning volunteer work was done, Richard and I went in search of a feasible access to the upper Osage Fork. We first scouted the J road bridge at mile marker 9.0 and that was too soft to consider parking, though the water was flowing quite nicely there encouraging the opportunity for upstream access. We continued on J to Morgan and headed down J-687 (Orchid Dr.) to the low water bridge and found that there was no parking near the bridge, but that parking did appear available for a limited number of vehicles just north of the bridge, so we dropped one vehicle off at mile marker 4.3 and continued to Rader Conservation Access to check that out. The access requires you to hand carry the boats and gear down, but is fairly easy to access and only about 20 yards of distance from the parking lot to the river.

The water looked to be flowing nicely at the access so we put on and started our paddle. The upper Osage Fork is much smaller than the lower parts we have done in the past. It is much like a small Ozark creek in nature with a narrow width, clear water, pretty Ozark gravel bottom, and plenty of little twists and turns. As we paddled along we noted a couple of eagles and a heron.

Rader Conservation access

Rader Conservation access

Osage Fork

Ice on the river

Ice on the river

Shortly into the trip we found some iced in coves and played around breaking the ice, an activity I find fun. We broke off some big ice chunks and sent them down river. We did this on a few bends. While Richard was exploring and taking some photographs, I paddled up Panther creek to see what it was like. It was a nice small creek still with decent flow. There was a bluff pocked with a few erosion holes and an animal trail leading to one of them. I paddled back down to find Richard had pushed onward.

Low water bridge at County Rd. 107

Low water bridge at County Rd. 107

Osage Fork

I paddled downstream and found Richard as we reached a low water bridge about an hour into the 4.3 mile float on County Rd. 107 (Auburn Rd.). The water was moving sufficiently to go under the bridge without much issue, albeit it fairly tight fitting with the water levels we had on this day. On the downstream side of the bridge the water constricted through it, making for some fun little waves to go play in. Naturally, I went to play and surf for a while and Richard portaged around the bridge. After a few runs of surfing and wave play, I parked next to the rapid and waited for Richard. For some reason, probably because of my adventurous nature, I took one last run at the rapid and at a poor angle. While I tried to recover my boat from a full flip, I just fell out and swam the boat and myself to shore. Being a 50 degree day I immediately removed as many of my soaking wet layers as possible and started drying them in the sun. While I was having my swimming lesson, Richard was having issues negotiating the portage and also took a swim. So we both had a good laugh and the cold refreshing feeling one gets when taking a dip in a cold Missouri waters. I maintained that refreshing tingle for hours after my swim.

Osage Fork

Access at the J-687 Bridge

Access at the J-687 Bridge

By the time we were getting warmed up from our swim the next low water bridge approached. Richard changed in to dry clothes while I picked up trash, and we then ran our shuttle. While completing the shuttle, we both determined this would be fun to do with more water if a better access can be located above the 28.7 mile marker.

Critter Count: Bald Eagles, Herons, Kingfishers, Turtles

Float #117: Osage Fork

26 Feb

Long Ford to Dry Knob

F117_Osage

Osage Fork River
Laclede County, Missouri
Sunday, February 8
10 Miles

For one glorious weekend in the beginning of February the weather warmed up to nearly 70˚. It was a nice break from the below freezing temps, so we headed west to get in a float trip before the weather turned cold again. We decided to float the Osage Fork, a river that doesn’t get much love with all the other floating options in the area. The Osage is a smaller river that doesn’t boast the grand scenery of the Big Piney or the Niangua, but it is a good option for a winter paddle. We met up with our friend Tommy and his son in their aluminum canoe and our friend Richard in his kayak. Ocoee came along too, but he is getting a little big for sitting in the cockpit of my boat, so I made him ride on the back.

We met up around 10am at the Long Ford access at the Hwy. B bridge. Long Ford is a gravel bar conservation access with a small gravel parking lot. While we waited for Richard to arrive DW cleaned up a bunch of litter and Ocoee did his part by eating some hot dogs he found by a recently used campfire. DW and Tommy ran shuttle down to Dry Knob (Hwy. 32 bridge), which took about 45 minutes round trip. We set off around 11:30 on a gorgeous, sunny day. The water was still very cold, but also very clear. There were a few low spots that the canoe had trouble getting through, but I never had to portage the kayak.

Hwy. B access

Long Ford access

Ocoee is ready to go

Ocoee is ready to go

Osage ForkOsage ForkOsage ForkWe have floated the Osage Fork once before, downstream from Dry Knob. I think this section is much nicer, with more bluffs and tighter turns and ripples. There are several very small springs along this stretch as well. It was very easy to find them in the winter with no vegetation in the way.  One drawback to the Osage is that it has several cow fields that access the river, so you will probably run into some cows on your trip. We did the first time we floated the Osage and we saw several of them this time as well.

Cows watch us warily

Cows watch us warily

Looking down at the river from a spring

Looking down at the river from a spring

Osage ForkOsage Fork

Old iron bridge

Old iron bridge

There was a lot of wildlife out on the river since the weather was so warm. Several turtles had crawled out of the mud to sunbathe and we saw many birds, including hawks and eagles. DW saw a beaver running along the bank and we saw plenty of the chewed tree trunks they had been working on.

DW explores a hole in the wall

DW explores a hole in the wall

Osage Fork

Ocoee rides the back of my boat

Ocoee rides the back of my boat

Osage ForkWe also saw several holes in the bluffs that could have been caves, and one that definitely was a cave, though it didn’t go back too far. There weren’t too many obstacles on this stretch besides the occasional tight turn and one tree that had recently fallen across the channel. DW spent a few minutes trimming back the branches so we had a path through it. However, my boat got spun around at exactly the wrong time and I ended up going backwards through the tree, which is always fun. Ocoee did a good job of riding on the back of my boat and he only fell off once. I made a quick maneuver of the back end to avoid hitting a fallen tree trunk and Ocoee did not move with me. DW was right behind me and scooped him out of the water. Ocoee wasn’t even wet to the skin thanks to his Labrador coat.

Osage ForkOsage Fork

Bald Eagle

Bald Eagle

Osage Fork

Upstream from Dry Knob access

We saw a trio of adult Bald Eagles and one juvenile about half way through our trip and they flew downstream just ahead of us the rest of the way. Around every third bend or so we would see them again. We arrived at our take-out around 4:30, packed up our gear and ran shuttle. By then time we were done with that it was dark and time to make the long trek home. I really enjoyed this stretch of the Osage. It has just enough challenges and scenery to keep it interesting, yet still relaxing and fun. It was a good weekend and a relief to get outdoors in some nice weather. It has been too cold to paddle since then, but we’re hoping things will pick up in March.

Critter Count: Turtles, Ducks, Kingfishers, 1 Juvenile Bald Eagle, 3 Adult Bald Eagles, Hawks, 1 Osprey, 1 Beaver

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